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College Hockey – Timetable for European Players

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Screenshot 2014-10-27 22.32.52More and more Swiss players (and their parents) show interest to continue their hockey development in the US combining it with obtaining a College degree. Unfortunately with most it comes as an afterthought once their hockey development in Switzerland does not progress as planned. [continue reading…]

NCAA – Amateur Status. Beware!

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NCAA_IceHockey_logoWith the start of training camps in Europe, I’ve received an increased number of inquiries about the NCAA Amateur Status regulations. This is a minefield not only for European but also North American players (see blog post Amateurism Requirements).

Here’s a brief synopsis of the most important points to keep in mind to avoid jeopardizing your NCAA Amateur Status:

48 hours camp rule
Don’t stay longer than 48 hrs at a professional team camp if the organization is covering your expenses. After the initial 48 hrs, you may stay but have to pay for all incurred camp expenses.

Pro teams exhibition games
Don’t play any exhibition games with a pro team, in the case of Switzerland Nat. A or Nat. B. Of course this also applies to any other European or North American pro leagues including CHL.

Agent Contract
Don’t sign an Agreement with an Agent nor have a tacit, verbal understanding.

Gifts
Don’t accept any monetary or material gifts, not even team jerseys, hats, T-Shirts.

If your goal is to play NCAA College Hockey it is imperative not to violate any of these rules. Too many players HAVE lost their NCAA Eligibility or had to accept long suspensions because of breaching the NCAA Amateurism Rules! More about this subject: DiCuria – FAQ Amateurism Certification and College Hockey NCAA Eligibility College Hockey Inc. – NCAA Eligibility

USA – Youth Ice Hockey

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In Europe’ Junior Hockey includes all age levels starting at U6 and going all the way up to U20. In the US they distinguish between Youth Hockey and Junior Hockey. Youth hockey starts at the U6 level (Mites) up to U18 (Midget). The Junior Hockey Leagues age group is 16 – 20 (see my post US Junior Ice Hockey – Leagues). There is an overlap at the 16-18 age level where players already play in Junior Leagues or at the Midget (Youth) level (more about this further down). [continue reading…]

US Junior Ice Hockey – Leagues

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In a previous post I compared Swiss Junior Hockey with the USA Hockey Junior model  {Junior Hockey: Comparison USA – Switzerland}. The US Junior Hockey system is hard to understand for a European. I see this in the dazzled looks every time I try to explain the various Tier’s, and Leagues in the Tier III, and the emails I receive on the subject.  Here’s an attempt to explain the US Junior Hockey system, mostly based on a recent article by Alex Kyrias, Director Communications and Sales, NAHL (Junior Hockey: make the smart and informed decision) [continue reading…]

Does Birth Month Affect Success in Hockey?

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The debate about whether being born in the first few months of the calendar year poses a significant advantage for a hockey player over being born in the latter months of the year isn’t new. The argument that a player born in January of a particular calendar year will have a distinct developmental advantage over a player born in December of the same year isn’t even really something that can be debated; at least not in the “on average” sense, and especially not in the early years of physical development. The fact is kids born in January are typically bigger, stronger and more advanced than kids born in December of the same birth year, during the early years of development. [continue reading…]

NCAA – Amateurism Certification Process FAQ

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Screenshot 2014-10-05 12.51.58Frequently I receive questions about the NCAA Certification Process. The NCAA published an article “Frequently Asked Questions” about the subject. I believe it is very comprehensive and answers the main questions related to the Registration Process with the NCAA Eligibility Center. [continue reading…]